Difference between revisions of "Portal:Data Protection/Introduction"

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Privacy is one of the fundamental rights guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the protection of your data is closely related. In a democratic society, privacy is an essential enabler for other fundamental rights, such as the freedom of expression and to form and join associations. However, growing commercial interests are pushing for weaker privacy protections and loose legislation on the use of personal data that would facilitate the collection, sharing with 'third parties', processing, 'mining' and sale of personal data.
; Must read:
 
* [http://www.laquadrature.net/en/Privacy The web-dossier]
 
* [[Privacy_documents| Treasure Chest of documents on TAFTA]]
 
* [[Privacy_Nightmare| Privacy Nightmare]]
 
* All element of the wiki related [http://www.laquadrature.net/wiki/Category:Privacy Privacy]
 
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The protection of privacy is a fundamental right guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In a democratic society, privacy is an essential enabler for other fundamental rights, such as the rights to freedom of expression and to form and join associations. However, many players now find an interest in watering down the protection of this fundamental right to increase the surveillance of citizens or to exploit information about them, by collecting, processing, storing and trading it. These practices, dangerous for our liberties both online and offline, are already becoming widespread on the Internet.
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Privacy protecting legislation, faced with the fact that in the digital age the collecting, sharing and 'mining' of data has become ubiquitous, has to adapt to continue protecting citizens. But the opposite is happening. The [http://www.laquadrature.net/wiki/images/6/69/Data_protection_proposal_regulation.pdf revision of the European regulation concerning the protection of personal data], initiated by the European Commission in 2012, is proposing safeguards that are too weak to effectively protect citizens' privacy.  
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In March 2013, the European Parliament voted to [http://www.laquadrature.net/en/major-loopholes-remain-in-european-parliaments-data-protection-regulation adopt a regulation on data protection]. This regulation continues to contain serious weaknesses. In 2015 the regulation is being negotiated in a trialogue between the European Commission, Parliament and European Council.
  
The right to protect our privacy needs to be adapted to the digital era and strengthened to take up these new challenges. But the opposite is happening, the [http://www.laquadrature.net/wiki/images/6/69/Data_protection_proposal_regulation.pdf revision of the European regulation concerning the protection of personal data], initiated by the European Commission in 2012, could lead to watering down these safeguards, contrary to citizens' interests. Rather than bowing down to private influences, it is essential that policy-makers force companies to more transparency and accountability for the protection of our data and prohibit abuses.
 
 
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Latest revision as of 12:15, 20 July 2015

Data Protection Logo

Privacy is one of the fundamental rights guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the protection of your data is closely related. In a democratic society, privacy is an essential enabler for other fundamental rights, such as the freedom of expression and to form and join associations. However, growing commercial interests are pushing for weaker privacy protections and loose legislation on the use of personal data that would facilitate the collection, sharing with 'third parties', processing, 'mining' and sale of personal data.

Privacy protecting legislation, faced with the fact that in the digital age the collecting, sharing and 'mining' of data has become ubiquitous, has to adapt to continue protecting citizens. But the opposite is happening. The revision of the European regulation concerning the protection of personal data, initiated by the European Commission in 2012, is proposing safeguards that are too weak to effectively protect citizens' privacy.

In March 2013, the European Parliament voted to adopt a regulation on data protection. This regulation continues to contain serious weaknesses. In 2015 the regulation is being negotiated in a trialogue between the European Commission, Parliament and European Council.